Firsts in San Bernardino

1884 - First Steam

Powered Fire Engine in

San Bernardino (initially

hand drawn, later horse

drawn).

Click here for more Firsts.

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HOURS:
Saturdays 10 AM - 3 PM

FREE Admission

FREE Parking

FREE Tours

LOCATION:
1170 W. Third Street
San Bernardino, CA 92410

Map & Directions

MAILING ADDRESS:
San Bernardino
Historical &
Pioneer Society

P.O. Box 875
San Bernardino, CA 92402

EMAIL:
sbrrdays@me.com

PHONE:
(909) 888-3634 

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Depot & Museum Tour

September 03, 2014

Tours will  be conducted

on  the  first Wednesday of

each month at 10:00 am.

Call (909)  888-3634  for

a reservation.  FREE

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Group Tours

For a Group Tour on

Saturday or any other 

day call (909) 888-3634.

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Virtual Museum Tour

Click here for visual tour

of the museum.

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Photo Histories

Click here to view local San

Bernardino and railroad

photographic histories.

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Newsletters of the

Western Archives of

the Santa Fe Railway

Click here for Newsletters 

of the Santa Fe Railway

Historical and Modeling

Society (Western Archives).

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Norton AFB Museum

Now Open:

Thursday 10:00 to 2:00

Saturday  10:00 to 2:00

More...

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Next Meeting at Coco's

The next meeting of the

National Association of

Retired & Veteran Railway

Employees will be held

at Coco's Restaurant.

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Thursday
Dec312015

Upcoming Events:

The Museum is open Saturday from 10:00 to 3:00  (Virtual Museum Tour 

October 18, 2014 - Roundhouse Gang Model Railroad Club's Swap Meet at the Santa Fe Depot

Friday
Aug222014

Was San Bernardino the First City to Paint the Curbs in Front of Fire Hydrants?

 

*  The above photograph and accompanying article were taken from the September 1917 issue of THE AMERICAN CITY magazine, Vol. XVII, No. 3, page 258.

*  Unfortunately, we only have the first part of the article and do not have the rest of the story.

*  We do know that the business behind the fire hydrant is that of Boyd-Scott & Lathrop Real Estate Loans, located at 467 3rd Street in downtown San Bernardino.

*  Question:  Was San Bernardino the first city to start painting red curbs or putting "No Parking" signs in front of fire hydrants?

*  What’s best of all, the hydrant showed in the magazine is just like the one in the San Bernardino History and Railroad Museum!

(Thanks to Steve Shaw for the photo & the article.)

Friday
Aug152014

2014 Route 66 Rendezvous - San Bernardino

*  Great Food...Kids' Games...Poker Run...

    Open Header Contest....Merchandise....

    People's Choice Awards.....Vendors......

*  Fri.  October 10, 2:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

*  Sat. October 11, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

*  At the: San Manuel Baseball Stadium

           280 E. Street, San Bewrnardino

*  For more information:

(909) 885-7515

rendezvoustoroute66.com

sbachamber.org

email: sba.chamber@verizon.net

Friday
Apr252014

Model Railroad Swap Meet - October 18, 2014

 
   Train-Station Swap Meet

*  Saturday, October 18, 2014

*  8:00 am until Noon (Vendor setup 6:30 am to 8:00 am)

*  At the Santa Fe Depot...1170 West Third Street, San Bernardino, CA 92410  

*  Admission: $4.00 donation.  Accompaning spouse and under 18 free.   

*  Contact: Larry (951) 686-7890 or Gary (909) 794-3153 gwinterg@verizon.net 

Sunday
Apr202014

September 10, 1923 - A Day to Remember

 

In 1921, a $200,000 bond was passed to finance a Municipal Memorial Hall to honor the vetrans killed in World War I.  The hall was built within two years, on the site of the old Pavilion and soon became known as the Municipal Auditorium.  Six Grecian columns of Ionic design adorned the front of the building.

The building had a 100 by 114 foot auditorium that seats 3,000 and a stage that can hold 300.  It was the first building west of New York that had sound-deading acoustic tile.

On Monday, September 10, 1923, a three day grand opening celebration began:

-  Opening ceremonies on the first evening drew over 2,000 people, including hundreds of children.

-  Over 3,000 folks heard the San Bernardino Community Orchestra on the second day.

-  The Grand Ball and Pioneer Dance drew another 2,000 to the closing night festivities.

For decades, the building was in constant use for all kinds of cultural events, dances, circuses, conventions, big bands, etc.  But by the sixties, there were fewer and fewer gatherings at the Auditorium.

Over the years there was talk of turning it into a museum or art gallery, or maybe even a boxing arena.  On January 5, 1979, the city locked its doors due to safety concerns.  It was estimated that $750,000 was needed to bring the 56 year old building up to modern building and fire standards.  

About the same time the city was told that the City Public Library would have to vacate its quarters in two years to make room for the County Superblock.  To build a new lbrary on the site of the Auditorium was $2.0 million less than rennovating the old building for use as a library.

In June of 1982, the Municipal Auditorium was torn down to make way for the Norman F. Feldhyem Library.

Thursday
Apr172014

September 20, 1913 - A Day to Remember

The wooden Pavilion, San Bernardino’s first public auditorium, was built in 1890 and was dedicated on New Year's Day in 1891.  It was located in the park where the Feldheym Library is now located.

The Pavilion soon became a very popular gathering place hosting everything from political rallies to religious meetings to social affairs, conventions, fairs, dances and parties of all kinds.  Company K of the local California National Guard used the basement to store ammunition.

In 1904, over 1,000 attended the reception and banquet for visiting railroad engineers.  By 1910, Mrs. Beeman was conducting a kindergarten class there.  

During political campaigns, audiences of 3,500 to 4,000 filled every corner of the famous old building. The Pavilion was used for the last time when Governor Hiram Johnson spoke before a large crowd in 1913.  

Shortly after 1:00 AM on September 20, 1913, the Pavilion caught fire and was consumed in a spectacular blaze.  Explosions of ammunition stored in the basement blew the burning fragments of the roof into the air, and flames roared upward hundreds of feet.

After the fire the only question on everyone's mind was, "When will there be erected another to take its place?" It was 10 years before the Pavilion was replaced by the Municipal Auditorium.